Discussion:
remastering as a live disk
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Philip Mundhenk
2017-12-23 05:23:56 UTC
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Are there any tools for cloning an OpenBSD installation as a live disk, like the ones in the in the Debian (Respin; Remastersys) and Mandrake (Makecd?) families of Gnu/Linuxes? Or any reasonably painless way of making a customized OpenBSD live disk?

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Because the Constitution must not be allowed to
Maurice McCarthy
2017-12-23 09:29:48 UTC
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Post by Philip Mundhenk
Are there any tools for cloning an OpenBSD installation as a live disk, like the ones in the in the Debian (Respin; Remastersys) and Mandrake (Makecd?) families of Gnu/Linuxes? Or any reasonably painless way of making a customized OpenBSD live disk?
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Because the Constitution must not be allowed to become "a literary fiction."
Try fuguita.org
Nick Holland
2017-12-23 19:08:57 UTC
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Post by Philip Mundhenk
Are there any tools for cloning an OpenBSD installation as a live
disk, like the ones in the in the Debian (Respin; Remastersys) and
Mandrake (Makecd?) families of Gnu/Linuxes? Or any reasonably
painless way of making a customized OpenBSD live disk?
Live CD? Do people still do that? There are ways, not worth the
trouble. Sheesh. CDROMs are so ... 1990s, apparently.

Live USB? Sure. Just (get this) INSTALL TO A USB DRIVE! (what a
surprise, huh?). Just a normal install. Really. When it asks what
drive to install on, point it to your USB drive.

Ok, ok, people love to twist knobs to say they DID SOMETHING unique and
special, so here are a few tips:
* Don't bother to install compXX.tgz. It's slow to install on a flash
drive, and you are unlikely to be compiling anything.
* Create lots of "/etc/hostname.xx0" files (or hard link them all) for
every NIC you are likely to encounter. contents of the file: "dhcp"
* noatime and softdeps are not just your friend, but just about required
on a flash drive (/etc/fstab)
* Encrypting your flash drive is a good idea. I lose mine all the time.
Bad to lose your ssh keys or whatever it is you are trying to carry
around with you, worse to have someone else find them (bioctl).
* change the code in /boot from saying ">> OpenBSD/amd64 BOOT 3.33" to
"HaHa! your machine is now infected with a virus", and "boot>" to
"you're screwed>". Or "UR Skrewd>" to make it look more authentic. At
least when you lose your flash drive, you will get a good laugh knowing
what will happen when someone finds it and wonders what's on it! (and
cool thing is, since they will probably try to boot it on a Windows
machine...and they are prone to stupidly sticking things in their
computer, the message is very possibly right!) (man release)
* A small MFS /tmp might be a really good idea if your apps use it.
(mount_mfs)
* Put an FAT partition at the beginning of the disk, that way it's still
handy to move files around...double duty! You will probably have to
partition it on OpenBSD, last I looked, Windows doesn't believe there is
any reason to partition removable media (heh), but it will use just FAT
partitions if they exist "somehow". (fdisk, newfs_msdos)
* If you really use this a lot, maybe invest in a USB SSD rather than
USB Flash drive.

Nick.

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